Middlesex-London Health Unit

🔍Search
🔍 or Ask a Question
Home
Inner Nav

Ticks in Middlesex-London

The most common types of ticks found in Middlesex-London are dog ticks and blacklegged ticks. NOTE: Lyme disease can only be transmitted through blacklegged ticks. In the Middlesex-London region, dog ticks are more commonly found than blacklegged ticks.

 

Protect

Wear insect repellant that contains DEET. Check yourself and family members for ticks.

Learn more

Remove

Use tweezers. Grab the tick as close to the head as possible. Pull the tick upwards and away from the body. Clean the area with soap and water. Wash your hands.

Learn more

Submit

Submit ticks to the Health Unit for identification. Tick submissions are accepted year round.

How to Submit a Tick

Ticks found in our region

See the characteristics of dog ticks, blacklegged ticks and lone star ticks from the chart below.

 
Ticks

Download (PDF)

Female Blacklegged Tick

Female Blacklegged Tick

Female blacklegged ticks can be the size of a sesame seed.

 
Male Dog Tick
Characteristics
Male Dog Tick
Has white colours down entire back
Has 8 legs
Can be the size of a pencil’s eraser
Does not transmit Lyme Disease
 
Female Dog Tick
Characteristics
Female Dog Tick
Only has white colours on a portion of her back
Has 8 legs
Is not engorged (has not fed)
Can be the size of a pencil’s eraser
Does not transmit Lyme Disease
 
Female Dog Tick - Engorged
Characteristics
Female Dog Tick - Engorged
Has the same white colours still present on her back
Is engorged (has fed)
Can be the size of a large raisin
Does not transmit Lyme Disease
 
Male Blacklegged Tick Characteristics
Male Blacklegged Tick
Is black down entire back
Has 8 legs
Can be the size of a sesame seed

Is not a risk for Lyme Disease*

Adult Male Blacklegged Ticks are capable of carrying the bacteria that causes Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), however it has not yet been determined as to whether or not the male is capable of transmission.

 
Female Blacklegged Tick Characteristics
Female Blacklegged Tick
Has black and orange/red on her back
Has 8 legs
Is not engorged (has not fed)
Can be the size of a sesame seed
Can transmit Lyme Disease
 
Female Blacklegged Tick - Semi Engorged
(about 3-5 days attached)
Characteristics
Female Blacklegged Tick - Semi Engorged
Has the same black colour still present on her back
Is engorged (has fed)
Can be the size of an peppercorn
Can transmit Lyme Disease
 

Female Blacklegged Tick - Fully Engorged
(about 5+ days attached)

Characteristics
Female Blacklegged Tick - Fully Engorged
Has the same black colour still present on her back
Is engorged (has fed)
Can be the size of an apple seed
Can transmit Lyme Disease
 
Male Lone Star Tick Characteristics
Male Lone Star Tick
Brown back with small white markings on his back
Has 8 legs
More circular than Blacklegged Ticks
Does not transmit Lyme Disease*
Can transmit Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii (which cause human ehrlichiosis), tularemia, and STARI*1
 
Female Lone Star Tick Characteristics
Female Lone Star Tick
Brown with a single white dot on her back
Has 8 legs
More circular than Blacklegged Ticks
Does not transmit Lyme Disease*
Can transmit Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii (which cause human ehrlichiosis), tularemia, and STARI*1
 
Female Lone Star Tick - Engorged
(about 5+ days attached)
Characteristics
Female Lone Star Tick
Still has a single white dot on her back
Is engorged (has fed)
Can be the size of an apple seed
Does not transmit Lyme Disease*
Can transmit Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii (which cause human ehrlichiosis), tularemia, and STARI 1
 
Date of creation: April 6, 2018
Last modified on: May 24, 2018

References

1Tickborne Diseases of the United States: A Reference Manual for Health Care Providers, Fourth Edition, 2017 Retrieved from
https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/resources/TickborneDiseases.pdf