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Sleep

Sleep is a restorative activity.2 Sleep improves attention, behaviour, memory, and overall mental and physical health. Not getting enough sleep increases the risk for injury, hypertension, obesity and depression.

 

Recommended Hours of Sleep By Age

Age Hours of Sleep per Night
Infants (0-3 months) 14-17 hours of good-quality sleep, including naps
Infants (4-11 months) 12-16 hours of good-quality sleep, including naps
Toddlers (1-2 years) 11-14 hours of good-quality sleep, including naps, with consistent bedtimes and wake-up times
Preschoolers (3-4 years) 10-13 hours of good-quality sleep, which may include a nap, with consistent bedtimes and wake-up times
School-aged (5-13 years) 9-11 hours per night with consistent bed and wake-up times
Adolescents (14-17 years) 8-10 hours per night with consistent bed and wake-up times
Adults (18-64 years) 7-9 hours per night
Older Adults (65+ years) 7-8 hours per night

Note: Ages and Hours of Sleep are based on recommendations from the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years and Children and Youth. Adult and Older Adult hours of sleep are based on recommendations from the National Foundation of Sleep.

 
Are you getting enough sleep?

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Image source: Public Health Agency of Canada

 

Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines

The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (5-17 years) recommend that children and youth should achieve high levels of physical activity, low levels of sedentary behavior, and sufficient sleep each day.4 Getting more active during the day can help can help children sleep better at night.

The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Early Years (0-4 years) recommend a balance of moving, sitting and sleeping for children age 4 and under for healthy growth and development with support from their parents and caregivers.

If no amount of sleep makes you feel rested when you wake up, you may want to seek medical advice, including evaluation for a sleep disorder.
 
Date of creation: November 1, 2017
Last modified on: June 7, 2019
 
 

References

1Public Health Agency of Canada. (2019). Are Canadian Adults Getting Enough Sleep? Retrieved from
https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/publications/healthy-living/canadian-adults-getting-enough-sleep-infographic.html
2Government of Canada Data Blog. (2017-01-17). Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep (PASS): a new way of tracking healthy daily activity. Retrieved from
http://infobase.phac-aspc.gc.ca/datalab/pass-blog-en.html
3Statistics Canada. (2017) Duration and quality of sleep among Canadians aged 18 to 79. Retrieved from
https://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/2017009/article/54857-eng.htm
4Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology. (2017). CSEP Guidelines. Retrieved from
https://csepguidelines.ca/