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COVID-19 Vaccine

Safe and effective vaccines will help protect us against COVID-19 and are a vital tool in our response to this pandemic. Please continue to follow public health guidance as Ontario safely and cautiously reopens. Let’s keep our progress going throughout summer.

Starting in August, there will be new hours and days of operation for mass vaccination clinics in Middlesex-London. Learn more →

Where to Get Vaccinated

Walk-in Pop-Up Community Clinics
Pfizer vaccine available to anyone 12+ and Moderna vaccine available to anyone 18+. First or second doses available, no appointment necessary, no health card required

See the pop-up clinic schedule →

Mass Vaccination Clinics (First or Second dose)

  • Walk In - Open to anyone 12+, no appointment necessary, 9AM to 5PM (Western Fair Agriplex, North London Optimist Community Centre, Earl Nichols Arena, and Caradoc Community Centre in Mount Brydges)
  • Book your appointment online →

NOTE: The Pfizer vaccine will be available to anyone 12+  and the Moderna vaccine will be available to anyone 18+ at all mass vaccination clinics. 

 

Questions About Your COVID-19 Vaccine Receipt

Learn more →

How to submit record of your COVID-19 vaccination if you received it outside of Ontario

Learn more →


How to access your vaccine receipt

After receiving a dose of COVID-19 vaccine, a receipt will be sent via email. If you did not receive an email confirming your first dose or second dose of vaccine, please click here to access your vaccination receipt through the provincial COVID-19 vaccination portal.

NOTE: you will need your date of birth, postal code and health card information in order to access your vaccination receipt online. You can only access your vaccination receipt through the provincial COVID-19 vaccination portal if you have a green Ontario Health Card and presented the card at the time of your vaccination.

If you do not have a green Ontario Health Card or used another form of identification (e.g. Driver’s License) at the time of vaccination, or if you have questions or concerns about your vaccine receipt, please call 226-289-3560 (8:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday to Sunday).


Pharmacies delivering vaccinations

COVID-19 vaccines are now available for adults 12 years of age and over at pharmacy locations in Ontario.

Book an appointment
To make an appointment, please contact the pharmacy directly.

Click here to find a participating pharmacy

 

About the COVID-19 vaccines

Which vaccines have been approved?

Health Canada has approved the following COVID-19 vaccines:

National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) 

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) occassionally releases statements on COVID-19 vaccines. To read the most recent statements, visit: National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI): Statements and publications and expand "COVID-19" from the list of vaccines.


Guide to Vaccination for Youth Aged 12-17

Vaccines are a safe and effective way to protect yourself, your child, and your family from COVID-19. They are an important tool to help stop the spread of COVID-19 and help students and their families safely resume normal activities. This guide will help you and your 12 to 17 year old decide if COVID-19 vaccination is right for them.

Download PDF


How do the COVID-19 vaccines work?

mRNA Vaccine

Both the Pfizer-BioNTech and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are mRNA vaccines. This means they use mRNA to teach the body’s cells how to make a protein which will cause your body to have an immune response and make antibodies. These antibodies then help fight an infection if the virus, which causes COVID-19, later enters the body. These vaccines do not use a live virus – they cannot give you COVID-19. Learn more →

Viral Vector-Based Vaccines

The Oxford-AstraZeneca and Janssen vaccines are viral vector-based vaccines. This means they use a harmless virus that doesn’t cause COVID-19 to act as a “vector.” When introduced to the body through the vaccine, this vector virus produces a protein that causes your body to have an immune response and make antibodies. These antibodies then help fight an infection if the virus, which causes COVID-19, later enters the body.


How are the COVID-19 vaccines given?

The COVID-19 vaccines are administered by an injection into your upper arm muscle.

Vaccine

Recommended Age Group

Number of Doses

Pfizer-BioNTech  12 years and older

2 doses*

Moderna  18 years and older

2 doses*

Oxford-AstraZeneca

*On June 12, 2021, the Province of Ontario updated its guidance for second doses for individuals who received a first dose of AstraZeneca to allow for receiving an mRNA vaccine or AstraZeneca for their second dose and shortening the interval between doses to 8 weeks.

Learn more →

18 years and older (as per Health Canada)7

30 years and older (as per NACI)9 

2 doses*
Janssen 

18 years and older (as per Health Canada) 8

30 years and older (as per NACI) 10

1 dose

 


Are the COVID-19 vaccines effective?

All vaccines approved by Health Canada for use in Ontario are determined to be safe and effective through an independent, scientific, and thorough review of the research. 

For more information, read:


Are the COVID-19 vaccines safe?

All vaccines approved by Health Canada for use in Ontario are determined to be safe and effective through an independent, scientific, and thorough review of the research.

As with most vaccines, common side effects have been reported during their research trials. These side effects are likely to be moderate and resolve after a few days. Learn more →

Vaccine

Very common or common side effects

Uncommon side effects

(may affect up to 1 in 100 people)

Pfizer-BioNTech 3
  • Pain at injection site
  • Redness at injection site
  • Swelling at injection site
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Joint pain
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Feeling unwell
Moderna 5
  • Pain at injection site
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Muscle ache and stiffness
  • Chills
  • Fever
  • Swelling or redness at the injection site
  • Nausea / Vomiting
  • Enlarged lymph nodes

 

Oxford-AstraZeneca 7

*On June 12, 2021, the Province of Ontario updated its guidance for second doses for individuals who received a first dose of AstraZeneca to allow for receiving an mRNA vaccine or AstraZeneca for their second dose and shortening the interval between doses to 8 weeks.

Learn more →

  • Tenderness, pain, warmth, redness, itching or swelling at injection site
  • Generally feeling unwell
  • Feeling tired (fatigue)
  • Chills or feeling feverish
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Feeling sick (nausea)
  • Being sick (vomiting) or diarrhea
  • Joint pain or muscle ache
  • Pain in legs or arms
  • Flu-like symptoms, such as high temperature, sore throat, runny nose, coughs and chills
  • Sleepiness or feeling dizzy
  • Decreased appetite
  • Abdominal pain
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Excessive sweating, itchy skin or rash
Janssen 8
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Muscle aches
  • Pain at injection site
  • Feeling very tired (fatigue)
  • Fever
  • Redness at injection site
  • Swelling at injection site
  • Chills
  • Joint pain
  • Rash
  • Muscle weakness
  • Arm or leg pain
  • Feeling weak
  • Feeling generally unwell

Important information: Adverse Reactions

In very rare situations, some people may experience serious symptoms or an adverse reaction. Learn more about the symptoms and when to go to the nearest emergency department or call 9-1-1: COVID-19 Vaccine Information Sheet.

When should I see a health care provider?
There have been a small number of reports of myocarditis and pericarditis (inflammation in different parts of the heart) following immunization with an mRNA vaccine. Most cases developed within one week of vaccination, have been mild and resolved quickly. Seek medical attention right away if you develop any of the following symptoms after vaccination:

  • Chest pain / feeling of pressure or tightness in your chest
  • Shortness of breath
  • Heart palpitations / irregular heartbeat

If you experience myocarditis or pericarditis after your first dose of an mRNA vaccine, speak with your health care provider or local public health unit for the most up-to-date recommendations regarding your second dose.

Update on the Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine

*The Government of Ontario has paused the administration of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine, effective Tuesday, May 11, 2021. Learn more →

*On June 12, 2021, the Province of Ontario updated its guidance for second doses for individuals who received a first dose of AstraZeneca to allow for receiving an mRNA vaccine or AstraZeneca for their second dose and shortening the interval between doses to 8 weeks.

Learn more →


Who should not get the COVID-19 vaccine?

You should not get the vaccine if you:

  • have ever had a severe allergic reaction (e.g. anaphylaxis) to a previous dose of the COVID-19 vaccine or any of its components or container
  • are younger than the approved age for the vaccine

You should delay getting the vaccine if you:

  • have received another vaccine, besides a COVID-19 vaccine, in the past 14 days
  • have symptoms of an acute or co-existing illness
  • have symptoms of COVID-19
  • have been advised to self-isolate due to a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection or close contact with someone who has COVID-19 – delay until your period of self-isolation is over

For more information, please read COVID-19 Vaccine Information Sheet.

There are certain situations when you will need to talk to your primary healthcare provider before receiving the vaccine. These include if you:

  • are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or plan to become pregnant (you must state that you have spoken with your healthcare provider prior to receiving the COVID-19 vaccine)
  • have a history of anaphylaxis or immediate allergic reaction to any other vaccine or injectable therapy (you must provide documentation at the COVID-19 vaccination clinic from an allergist-immunologist that it would be okay to immunize you in a non-hospital setting)
  • are receiving immunosuppressing therapies such as stem cell therapy, chemotherapy, CAR-T therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies (eg. Rituximab) and other targeted agents (such as CD4/6 inhibitors, PARP inhibitors etc). You must speak with your treating provider to ensure the timing of vaccine doses and therapies, and you must state that you have spoken to them prior to receiving the COVID-19 vaccine)

Remember to speak to the vaccinator (the person who will provide the vaccine to you) at the COVID-19 Immunization Clinic if you have discussed any of the issues mentioned above with your primary healthcare provider, or if you:

  • have had any problems following a previous vaccine
  • have any allergies
  • have a high fever or severe infection
  • have any serious illness
  • have an autoimmune condition
  • have a weakened immune system due to a medical condition or are taking medication that affects your immune system
  • have a bleeding disorder or are taking medication that could affect your blood clotting, if you bruise easily or are taking a blood-thinning medication
  • are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding

For more information, please read: COVID-19 Vaccination Recommendations for Special Populations.

 

More Information


Continue to follow public health guidance

Until COVID-19 vaccines are widely available and the majority of the population is vaccinated, it is vital that we all continue to follow local public health guidance. 

  • Limit interactions with others
  • Practice physical distancing
  • Wear a face covering while in enclosed places or where physical distancing cannot be maintained
  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for 15-20 seconds or use waterless hand sanitizer with 60% alcohol content
  • Cover your coughs and/or sneezes with your sleeve or cough into your elbow
  • Clean high-touch areas, such as doorknobs in public spaces, frequently
 
Date of creation: December 18, 2020
Last modified on: July 29, 2021

References

1Government of Canada. (2020). Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine: What you should know. Retrieved from
https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines/pfizer-biontech.html
2Government of Canada. (2020). Moderna COVID-19 vaccine: What you should know. Retrieved from
https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/drugs-health-products/covid19-industry/drugs-vaccines-treatments/vaccines/moderna.html
3BioNTech Manufacturing GmbH & Pfizer Canada ULC. (2020). Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine: COVID-19 mRNA vaccine, suspension for intramuscular injection [Product monograph]. Retrieved from
https://covid-vaccine.canada.ca/info/pdf/pfizer-biontech-covid-19-vaccine-pm1-en.pdf
4National Advisory Committee on Immunization. (2020, December 12). Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccine(s). Retrieved from
https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines.html
5Moderna Therapeutics Inc. (2020, December). Moderna COVID-19 vaccine mRNA-1273 SARS-CoV-2 vaccine: Suspension for intramuscular injection [Product monograph]. Retrieved from
https://covid-vaccine.canada.ca/info/pdf/moderna-covid-19-vaccine-pm1.pdf
6National Advisory Committee on Immunization. (2021). Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Government of Canada. Retrieved from
https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines.html
7Government of Canada. (2021). Details for: Astrazeneca COVID-19 vaccine. Retrieved from
https://covid-vaccine.canada.ca/info/astrazeneca-covid-19-vaccine-en.html
8Government of Canada. (2021). Details for: Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. Retrieved from
https://covid-vaccine.canada.ca/info/janssen-covid-19-vaccine-en.html
9National Advisory Committee on Immunization. (2021, April 23). Summary of updated vaccine statement of April 23, 2021. Government of Canada. Retrieved from
https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/summary-updated-statement-april-23-2021.html
10National Advisory Committee on Immunization. (2021, May 3). Recommendations on the use of COVID-19 vaccines. Government of Canada. Retrieved from
https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/immunization/national-advisory-committee-on-immunization-naci/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines/recommendations-use-covid-19-vaccines-en.pdf